Foundation system

Fundraising for the celebration of the 80th anniversary of the University Hospital Foundation

“Patients have a much better experience because we are able to get a diagnosis and start treatment faster, which also reduces the burden on the healthcare system”

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Although I don’t look like I’m over 30, this year on October 5th I’m celebrating my 80th birthday and I plan to host a fundraiser at the Westin Hotel to raise $250,000. to help the University Hospital Foundation.

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Like many of us, I too have experienced the death of loved ones who lost their battle with cancer.

I lost both parents and a school friend to cancer, and a good friend of mine has been treated for breast cancer for the past eight years.

The Canadian Cancer Society reports that cancer is the leading cause of death in the country and is responsible for 28.2% of all deaths.

This means that it is almost guaranteed that each of us knows someone who has lost their battle with cancer or someone who is currently battling cancer.

Jodi Abbott, president and CEO of the University Hospital Foundation, tells me that one of the most needed pieces of equipment to help detect cancers of the small intestine is a double-balloon endoscope system.

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“This specialized equipment is used for the detection of colon and small intestine cancers that often cannot be detected by other systems, such as standard colonoscopy,” Abbott said.

“It can also detect disorders of the small intestine, such as Crohn’s disease, advanced celiac disease, narrowing of the intestine of any origin, polyps and tumors.”

Edmonton is one of the two main centers in Canada that specializes and performs the most procedures in Canada.

Dr. Sergio Zepeda and Dr. Brendan Halloran from the hospital explained to me how detecting abnormalities in the small intestine system can be extremely difficult and that most other detection methods have a rate of much lower success.

“Before double balloon endoscopy, the only way to access the small intestine was through surgery,” Dr. Zepeda said.

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“Endoscopic technology, especially the dual-balloon endoscope system, can lead to earlier detection instead of having to go through test after test.

“Patients have a much better experience because we are able to get a diagnosis and start treatment faster, which also reduces the burden on the healthcare system.”

Newspaper columnist Nick Lees, pictured here in a Yardley Jones cartoon, says he's had the chance to travel the world while writing for the Edmonton Journal, but adds it's time to do more to help fight cancer.  He and his friends are organizing a fundraiser to buy state-of-the-art equipment for our University Hospital Foundation.
Newspaper columnist Nick Lees, pictured here in a Yardley Jones cartoon, says he’s had the chance to travel the world while writing for the Edmonton Journal, but adds it’s time to do more to help fight cancer. He and his friends are organizing a fundraiser to buy state-of-the-art equipment for our University Hospital Foundation. Photo by Fourni

It was the late Patrick O’Callaghan, publisher of the Edmonton Journal, and Steve Hume, editor, who let me write columns under the name Nick Danger.

Oh, it was wonderful to break the sound barrier in a CF-101 military jet based on Vancouver Island before the plane was retired in the 1980s. Or in Cold Lake, fly in the aircraft that replaced it, the McDonnell Douglas CF-18 Hornet fighter.

I have also done many parachute jumps with the Airborne Regiment and encountered a shark while scuba diving in the Indian Ocean off Kenya.

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But I feel bad now for never writing about the disease that affected most families.

Although I have supported many Edmonton charities through marathons and bike rides around the world, I now have a plan to help fight cancer.

A big regret is doing nothing significant in 2017 to mark the passing of a close friend Fritz Koeppel, the former general manager of the Four Seasons Hotel in Edmonton who went on to manage the Banff Springs Fairmont Hotel.

Koeppel was part of our group in 1984 when Yukon guide Hector Mackenzie, Dr. Peter Lake and I were trapped for four days by a howling blizzard just below the summit of Mount Logan, Canada’s highest peak at 5,959 meters .

It was -70C when we built an igloo, fearing our tent would be blown away, and we ended up spending a total of 23 nights on the mountain.

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“Don’t worry we’re out of food,” Koeppel shouted to me over the howling wind one night. “I have two bars of Swiss chocolate.”

Sadly, I did nothing to mark his passing from pancreatic cancer, but I recently told Mackenzie that we should climb an unnamed peak, name it for Fritz, and raise money for cancer research. with pledges for each meter climbed.

So, as I celebrate my 80th birthday this year, I set myself the goal with some friends of raising $250,000 in collaboration with the Fondation du Center Hospitalier Universitaire. We will support this center of excellence in small bowel endoscopy with the purchase of a new double balloon endoscopic system.

“It’s a center where people from across Canada and other countries come to train,” says Dr. Halloran.

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“We also see patients from across the country, and through early detection, we can change health outcomes for many Canadians. »

Please consider donating, or better yet, join me for my birthday party on October 14th at the Westin Hotel.

A Parting Thought: The Canadian Cancer Society says researchers estimate there will be 233,900 new cases of cancer and 85,100 cancer deaths in Canada this year.

My friends and I are looking to raise $250,000 for the University Hospital Foundation to purchase a double balloon small bowel endoscope system and equipment to fight other cancers. Please join us by donating on the webpage at https://givetouhf.akaraisin.com/NicksBirthday

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