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The TLC Foundation for Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviors Celebrates National Hair Loss Awareness Month in August |

The TLC Foundation for Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviors is Raising Awareness for People Suffering from Hair Pulling or Trichotillomania

SANTA CRUZ, Calif., August 1, 2022 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ — The TLC Foundation for Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviors (BFRB) shares its support for National Hair Loss Awareness Month starting this August 2022. More than 80 million people lose their hair every year, 40% of whom are women. People who experience hair loss can also include those who have a BFRB called trichotillomania, also known as hair pulling disorder.

Hair pulling disorder usually begins in late childhood/early puberty and occurs about equally in boys and girls. In adulthood, 80-90% of reported cases are female. Hair pulling varies greatly in severity, location on the body, and response to treatment. Without treatment, hair pulling disorder tends to be a chronic condition. that can come and go throughout a lifetime.

The TLC Foundation for Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviors raises awareness and support for a group of underreported and misunderstood mental health disorders that affects approximately one in 20 Americans, with hair pulling being one of the most prevalent. Body-focused repetitive behaviors are complex medical diagnoses that affect children and adults alike and often cause shame, isolation, and emotional distress. Yet despite their prevalence in our communities, these behaviors are rarely discussed in public.

“There are so many misconceptions about body-focused repetitive behaviors that’s why they’re misdiagnosed, underreported, and understudied,” said Dr. John Piacentiniprofessor of psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences at UCLA, Chairman of the TLC Board of Directors and Chairman of the Scientific Advisory Board. “They are often dismissed as bad habits or categorized as rituals of self-harm, which they are not. There are enormous consequences to not recognizing these behaviors or misdiagnosing them, including depression, l anxiety and suicide for those affected.”

Fortunately, the stigma and shame surrounding these behaviors are beginning to change, thanks in part to recent advocacy by a comedian, writer, and actress. Amy Schumer, who has been tearing his hair out since childhood. In Episode 9 of her Hulu comedy-drama, “Life & Beth,” which is based on her own life, she wrote an accurate depiction of hair-pulling in a flashback to her teenage years. At the end of the Hulu episode, viewers were directed to the TLC Foundation website as a support and information resource.

National Hair Loss Awareness Month further empowers others to learn more about hair loss and lessen the shame that comes with losing hair for any reason. Additionally, this month allows for a period of reflection on traditional beauty standards with hair.

This month, TLC is hosting a series of free online events suitable for a variety of audiences to help destigmatize hair pulling and other related behaviors, share resources and support, answer questions from experts medical conditions, build community and provide a way forward for the management of these conditions. Visit the TLC website for times and details at http://www.bfrb.org.

August 15th TLC Together: BFRB Brave Books

August 24 TLC Talks: Back to School with the BFRBs

ABOUT THE TLC FOUNDATION for body-focused repetitive behaviors

The TLC Foundation for Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviors is a 501(c)3 health-related human service organization dedicated to supporting the 1 in 20 people with Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviors (BFRBs) through advocacy , awareness, connection, health education , celebration and equitable access to effective evidence-based treatments. To learn more, visit http://www.bfrb.org.

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Hair Pulling or Trichotillomania FAQ

What is hair pulling or trichotillomania?

  • Hair-pulling disorder or trichotillomania (trick-o-till-o-may-nee-uh) (TTM or “trich”) is characterized by the repetitive pulling of one’s hair. Hair pulling disorder is part of a group of behaviors known as body-focused repetitive behaviors (BFRBs), self-grooming behaviors in which individuals pull, pick, scratch, or bite their hair, skin or nails, resulting in damage to the body. .
  • Research indicates that approximately 1 or 2 in 50 people suffer from hair pulling disorder in their lifetime. Hair pulling disorder usually begins in late childhood/early puberty and occurs about equally in boys and girls. In adulthood, 80-90% of reported cases are female. Hair pulling varies greatly in severity, location on the body, and response to treatment. Without treatment, hair pulling disorder tends to be a chronic condition. that can come and go throughout a lifetime.

What are the signs and symptoms of hair pulling?

  • Hair-pulling disorder is currently classified under obsessive-compulsive and related disorders in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition.

DSM-5 diagnostic criteria include:

  • Recurring hair pulling, leading to hair loss
  • Repeated attempts to decrease or stop the behavior
  • Clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational or other functioning
  • Not due to substance abuse or a medical condition (e.g., dermatological condition)
  • Not better explained by another psychiatric disorder

When does hair removal take place?

  • Hair pulling can occur in a variety of sedentary and active settings and activities. There are times when the draw occurs in a goal directed manner and also in an automatic manner in which the individual is less aware. Many people report noticeable sensations before, during and after shooting. A wide range of emotions, from boredom to anxiety, frustration, and depression, can affect hair pulling, as can thoughts, beliefs, and values.

Does everyone who pulls their hair out lose their hair?

  • Although the severity of hair pulling varies widely, many people with trichotillomania have noticeable hair loss, which they try to cover up. Sparse or bald spots on the head can be covered up with hairstyles, scarves, wigs, or makeup. Those with missing eyelashes, eyebrows, or body hair may attempt to camouflage themselves with makeup, clothing, or other means to conceal the affected areas.

What are the effects of hair pulling?

  • Due to shame and embarrassment, individuals not only try to conceal the effects of hair pulling, but may also avoid activities and social situations that may cause them to feel vulnerable to “discovery”. (such as windy weather, going to the beach, swimming, doctor visits, hairdresser appointments, childhood sleepovers, getting ready for bed in a lighted area, and privacy).

What treatments are available for hair pulling?

  • There is no cure, but improvement is possible. Although no treatment has been proven to work for everyone, a number of evidence-based psychotherapeutic treatment options, including cognitive behavioral therapy, are successful for some.

To learn more about hair pulling and other repetitive body-focused behaviors, download TLC’s Expert Consensus Treatment Guidelines: https://www.bfrb.org/storage/documents/Expert_Consensus_Treatment_Guidelines_2016w. pdf

**Subject matter experts**

The TLC Foundation offers the following subject matter experts for media interviews.

To schedule an interview, please contact:

Jen Monteleoneacting general manager

Email: [email protected]

: 831-457-1004 ext. 1

To research:

  • dr. John PiacentiniChairman of the Board of Directors of TLC and Chairman of the Scientific Council of TLC, UCLA
  • dr. Nancy Keuthen, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School
  • dr. Jon Grant, University of Chicago
  • dr. Darin Dougherty, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School
  • dr. Doug Wood, Marquette University
  • dr. marty franklin, University of Pennsylvania Medicine School
  • dr. Tara Perris, UCLA
  • dr. Emily Ricketts, UCLA

Medicine:

  • dr. Jon Grant, University of Chicago
  • dr. Darin Dougherty, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School

Treatment:

  • dr. John PiacentiniChairman of the Board of Directors of TLC and Chairman of the Scientific Council of TLC, UCLA
  • dr. Suzanne Mouton OdumPsychology Houston, CP
  • dr. Nancy Keuthen, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School
  • dr. Charles MansuetoBehavioral Therapy Center Greater Washington
  • dr. Fred PenzelWest Suffolk Psychological Services
  • Ruth GolomBehavioral Therapy Center Greater Washington
  • dr. Doug Wood, Marquette University
  • dr. marty franklin, University of Pennsylvania Medicine School
  • dr. Tara Perris, UCLA
  • dr. Emily Ricketts, UCLA

Media Contact

Christine TouleTLC Foundation for BFRBs, 1 9162200169, [email protected]

SOURCE The TLC Foundation for BFRBs